Jun 30

The History of the WILC

The World Indoor Lacrosse Championship has been running ever since 2003, when Canada held the inaugural international indoor championship. It happens every four years, much like most of the other large sporting events around the world.

Ever since the tournament opened, Canada hasn’t lost a game. They are the world leaders and with good reason – they have formidable players led by a strong coach, and they always play aggressive strategies that put them right up in the goal all throughout the games.

In every tournament, the Iroquois have come in second, and the United States third. Hopefully in coming years we’ll see a bit more variety on the podium!

In 2015, we will see 11 nations compete in the WILC, which is the biggest turnout so far. There are some surprising newcomers – Israel, Turkey and Thailand – and with the Iroquois hosting, there is a good chance that the Canadians will have a real fight on their hands to maintain their title.

Indoor lacrosse (also known as box lacrosse) has been a popular game for a long time in the Western world, but few people realise that it first originated with the Native Americans. It was part of their culture for hundreds of years before it spread and gained worldwide popularity.

Canada, the USA, and England were the first countries to really pick up lacrosse after the Native Americans, creating a modern version of the game in the 1920s. By the 1930s, it had spread as far as Australia.

Lacrosse first became a professional sport in the 1970s, with the US and Canada leading the charge to standardise the sport and create ongoing tournaments. The World Indoor Lacrosse Championship had its first tournament in 2003, and these days, there are 31 members in the Federation of International Lacrosse. As the WILC continues and lacrosse become even more popular, I expect that this number will only grow.

May 25

Come on, 2015!

The countdown is now on as 2015 approaches, bringing with it the 4th World Indoor Lacrosse Championships. So far, there are not too many details available, but we’ll be keeping a close eye on it over the next few months.

Here’s what we’ve got so far:

Pool play and the quarter-finals will be held on Indigenous lands for the first time in the history of the sport, being hosted at Onondaga Nation Arena not far outside of Syracuse, New York.

The semi-finals and finals will then be held at the First Niagara Center in Buffalo, New York.

We’re also already seeing a wider range of nations committing to be present for the championship – and some of them might surprise you!

The Finland National Team has confirmed they will make their international indoor lacrosse debut at the 2015 WILC. Lacrosse officially arrived in Finland in the summer of 2001, and Finland’s field program has been a strong contender since its’ debut in 2004. They most recently finished 7th in the 2012 European Championships and 12th in the 2010 World Championships.

Turkey has also confirmed they will be present, even though Turkey has not yet debuted in an international tournament in either field or indoor lacrosse. However, they have several players who participate in the box-style European Lacrosse League so will be an interesting addition.

And in a left-field entry, Thailand has also announced their attendance! As it turns out, Thailand has been a leader in the growth of lacrosse in Asia, and has led organizational efforts for several exhibition matches on the continent.  Their men’s program will debut in their first international tournament at the 2014 World Field Lacrosse Championships.

So there are exciting times ahead, as more and more teams confirm, and preparations go full steam ahead.

Sep 13

All The Gory Details

Lacrosse is one of the fast growing team sports in the world. It is gaining in popularity all over the United States and Canada, throughout Australia and the UK, and throughout Europe.

The WILC 2011 Prague championships have certainly helped this along – it’s only the third championship to be held, and since the championships are four years apart, it’s the most recent and well-covered lacrosse event to have informed potential players.

What you typically don’t see in a lot of the televised coverage is the extent of the injuries. Sure, you might see a few across the course of the games, but you don’t get a real sense of how the injuries happen, and what the ongoing impact of them can be.

The most common lacrosse injuries are muscular or in the ligaments – strains and sprains in the ankle, knee and hamstring are pains every player knows. While these injuries are not crippling, they can certainly reduce a player’s effectiveness.

For this reason, every team travels with a physiotherapist and a proper massage table (provided at the championships by Massage World) to allow quick and proper treatment for every injury, no matter how seemingly small.

Other common injuries are contusions (AKA bruises), that come about from being whacked with the metal stick or the heavy rubber ball. Unfortunately bruises are an occupational hazard for the lacrosse player. Some are only skin-deep, but if you take a really solid hit, they can impact muscle deep into the tissue, and need to be cared for and even medicated so the player recovers as quickly as possible.

Finally, most players will experience rib fractures and concussions over the course of their career. Lacrosse is a very full-on contact sport, so it’s unavoidable, especially if you insist on playing without the heavy padding that would protect you (even though it does slow you down a little, it’s worth it for the sake of protecting your body!).

Jun 12

The Quarters, The Semis, The Finals!

On May 26, the quarter-finals and lower-tier games kicked off for the 2011 World Indoor Lacrosse Championships.

To recap who came out where during the Pool A and Pool B games:

From Pool A, Canada went to the semi-finals, Australia and England to the quarter finals, and Slovakia to the 7th-place play-offs.

From Pool B, Iroquois went to the semi-finals, the US and Czechs went to the quarter-finals, and the Irish went to the 7th-place play-offs.

In the quarter finals on May 26, the United States beat Australia, with a crushing score of 28 to 2. The same day, the Czech Republic beat England, 12 to 7. The first of the 7th-place play-offs also happened on the 26th, with Ireland defeating Slovakia, 10 to 5.

In the semi-finals on the 27th May, Canada beat the United States 15 to 10, and the Iroquois beat the Czechs with a resounding 19 to 6. The second of the 7th-place play-offs also happened on this day, with Slovakia this time beating Ireland. However Ireland won overall with an aggregate of 17 to 15.

The 5th-place play-off on the 28th saw England beat Australia, 23 to 8. The bronze medal game was won by the United States, who beat the Czech Republic 16 to 7. Finally, the gold medal game was won by Canada, the reigning champions who defeated the Iroquois 13 to 6.

Jun 02

WILC 2011 Prague Pool Games

The 2011 World Indoor Lacrosse Championships took place between the 21st May 2011 and the 28th May 2011. In this article, you’re going to get a breakdown of who played whom, and when, and who won!

So the championship started with Preliminary rounds, with Pool A and Pool B. The team that placed first out of the four automatically went through to the semi-finals, while the second and third placing teams went through to the quarter-finals. The fourth placing teams went to the 7th place play-offs.

Pool A was made up of Canada, Australia, England and Slovakia. On May 21, Australia and England played their first game, and England won. On the 22nd, Slovakia played Canada, and the Canadians won. On the 23rd, Slovakia played England, and Englad won, while Australia played Canada, and Canada won. On the 24th, Australia played Slovakia and won, while Canada played England and won.

So from Pool A, Canada went to the semi-finals, Australia and England to the quarter finals, and Slovakia to the 7th-place play-offs.

Pool B was made up of Iroquois, the United States, the Czechs, and Ireland. On May 21 Ireland played Iroquois, and the Iroquois won, while the US played the Czechs, and the US won. On May 22 Ireland played the US and the US won, while the Czechs played the Iroquois and the Iroquois won. On May 23 the Iroquois beat the US, and the Czechs beat the Irish.

So from Pool B, Iroquois went to the semi-finals, the US and Czechs went to the quarter-finals, and the Irish went to the 7th-place play-offs.

May 30

Welcome to WILC!

Welcome to the home of the 2011 World Indoor Lacrosse Championships! If you’re not familar with indoor lacrosse, let me tell you a bit about it before we get to the championship stuff.

Box lacrosse, also known as indoor lacrosse and sometimes shortened to boxla or simply box, is an indoor version of lacrosse played mostly in North America. The game originated in Canada, where it is the most popular version of the game played in contrast to the traditional field lacrosse game.

It is played between two teams of six players each, and is traditionally played on an ice hockey rink once the ice has been removed or covered. The playing area is called a box, in contrast to the open playing field of field lacrosse.

The object of the game is to use a long handled racket, known as a lacrosse stick, to catch, carry, and pass the ball in an effort to score by ultimately hurling a solid rubber lacrosse ball into an opponent’s goal.

At the highest level box lacrosse is represented by the Senior A divisions of the Canadian Lacrosse Association (Western Lacrosse Association of the British Columbia Lacrosse Association and Major Series Lacrosse of the Ontario Lacrosse Association), and the National Lacrosse League (NLL).

While there are thirty-one total members of the Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL), only eight nations have competed in international box lacrosse competition. Only Canada, Iroquois Nationals and the United States have finished in the top three places at the ILF World Indoor Lacrosse Championships.